Delaware River Valley Organic Garden Harvest

9 14 harvest 2What a great time of year for edible gardeners in this part of the country. The harvest keeps coming thanks to a still-warm-enough Sun and just enough rain. It’s time to “process” some of that harvest, putting up goods for winter. There’s a whole new season to anticipate – one made up of cool weather crops soon to be sheltered by “mini hoop houses.” And, of course, it’s time to reflect on the victories and failures of the year and learn what we can for next spring. Continue reading

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Can your yard reverse global warming?

grass 2

It just might help…if you go 100% organic. Scientists at the Rodale Institute (and other researchers) have found compelling evidence that organic farming helps soil bury (“sequester”) the carbon dioxide (CO2) that contributes to global warming. The same principles should apply to organic gardening and lawn care. That means we all have the power to help address this enormous problem…right in our own backyards. Continue reading

Don’t Miss the Annual Herb Society Sale at Holcombe-Jimison, Saturday, May 18

???????????????????????????????Each May, the Delaware Valley Unit of the Herb Society of America holds its annual herb sale at the Holcombe-Jimison Farmstead Museum, on Route 29 in Lambertville, NJ. Whether you’re just starting an herb garden or adding to one you’ve tended for years, this sale is a wonderful opportunity to find a wide variety of hearty, healthy plants at reasonable prices.

Once you pull into the Holcombe-Jimison Farmstead, you’ll find the herbs on display inside one of the museum’s many historic barns. The plants are arranged in alphabetical order on tables, just in front of a collection of antique farm vehicles. If you have questions about a particular plant, the Herb Society volunteers are always happy to share their substantial knowledge. Read more

Connecting the Dots to Live More Sustainably

Culinary herb garden

Culinary herb garden

Note that the article posted a moment ago was published accidentally! Please read this version instead!

Are you a vegan? Do you shop locally? Buy organic food? Belong to a time bank, co-op or informal sharing collective? Avoid plastic? Collect water in rain barrels? Buy electricity from a renewable generator? Use local currency? Commute via bike or public transportation? Live in an eco-friendly home?

There are many ways to live more sustainably today…and many “movements” advocating for one of these ways or another. But in this information-savvy age, with so many opportunities to “follow” those who think just like us, we can easily slip into a “silo” when it comes to our views and actions. Making connections between these silos can open doors to some surprising and innovative ways to live more sustainably.

Just consider some of the doors opened by edible gardening. Read more

Organic Seeds Warm Up the Season

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It’s been a beautiful winter weekend in the Delaware River Valley. Friday night’s light snowfall left a dusting of powder on bare branches, turning stark grey woods into delicate lace work. Seasonally cold, if only for a few days, the weather has been ideal for indoor activities like curling up with a good book…or paging through those organic seed catalogs that always seem to land in the mailbox just as the weather is at its coldest.

Good reading

Full of the brilliant colors and textures sorely missing from the winter landscape, seed catalogs can get us imagining ourselves as flawless gardeners, capable of cultivating the rarest flower or most esoteric vegetable. While reality will check those fantasies in a few months, for now, we can indulge them a bit by choosing from a wide variety of tiny packages. Read more

Mid-summer New Hope garden harvest, organic style

Despite the heat and the drought, the mostly organic garden is producing nicely. Pictured are tomatoes (organic plants from Gravity Hill Farm); beans (from organic Burpee seed); and cucumbers, eggplant, basil, marjoram and sage (from non-organic starter plants but fertilized and tended organically). Aren’t they pretty?

Fresh food photo op — keepin’ it local

Tomato, cucumber and scallion salad

A tasty and colorful salad made with all local Delaware River Valley ingredients — tomatoes and kirby cucumbers from Maximuck’s (www.maximucks.com), organic scallions from Gravity Hill Farm (www.gravityhillfarm.com) and fresh marjoram and oregano from the garden

Fingerling potato salad

A delicious potato salad made with fingerlings from None Such Farm Market (www.nonesuchfarms.com), more Gravity Hill scallions and organic parsley, marjoram and oregano from the garden