Locavores are making a difference

Those of us committed to buying from local farmers feel like we’re having a positive impact on our communities. Now it’s a little easier to quantify that impact, thanks to two recent studies — one national, another local.

According to an article posted today on www.msnbc (“USDA: ‘Locally grown’ food a $4.8 billion business”),  food sold either directly to local consumers or to local groceries, restaurants and other “intermediaries,” garnered $4.8 billion in revenue in 2008. The USDA predicts that local food sales will reach $7 billion this year. That growth apparently represents an increase in both farm-to-institution and direct-to-consumer sales. In the latter area, 136,000 farms now sell directly, vs. 86,000 in the early 1990s. And there are now 5,274 farmers markets, up from 2,756 in 1998. – Read more

Advertisements

Who’s got fresh food?

The New Leaf CSA (community-supported agricult...

Image via Wikipedia

If you’re interested in buying local food, you may already be shopping at one or more of these Delaware River Valley farmer’s markets, farm markets or community supported agriculture (CSA) programs. They’re all good places to get fresh, delicious food… and put money back into your local economy. Why not support more of them by coordinating farm-market shopping with errands or other trips around the area? – Read more

A Green (silver) lining?

The latter part of 2008 marked the beginning of the economic downturn. But was it also the dawn of something more positive? There’s growing evidence to suggest that just as the economy was cooling, demand for all things green-sustainable-and-local was heating up, taking a trend long in the making to a whole new level of success. – Read more

Fresh food

One manifestation of localism that clearly has taken off in the past few years is “locavorism.” The local food movement seems to be flourishing wherever there are affluent, discerning consumers, adventurous chefs and an ample supply of smallish, family-owned farms committed to diversified crops (and/or livestock) and direct-to-consumer marketing. – Read more